... let's have a look at the day that Dick Grayson graduated from high school after being held back for thirty years. And the historical implications for the Bat-comics surrounding it as a whole.

For different heroes (and their respective supporting casts) in the DC Universe, the exact moment of transition from "Golden Age" to "Silver Age" varied from "clear as day" - such as in the case of the Flash and Green Lantern, who had entirely new people take over the titles - to "muddled, vague, endlessly-debated mess" - as was the case with Superman and Batman.

The transition from "Silver Age" to "Bronze Age" was just as messy for many heroes, if not moreso. After all, unlike the jump from Golden to Silver, the jump from Silver to Bronze saw no retcon saying "Oh, all the comics published during [insert time period here] took place on this Earth, while the ones you're reading right now take place on this Earth!". A portion of comics fans and/or scholars today even deny the very existence of a "Bronze Age", choosing to lump all of the output from the 1970s to the mid-1980s (a rough approximation, mind you) into the Silver Age.

Still, there were definite changes in tone, art style, and story elements in most of DC's publications once the 1970s rolled around. Clark Kent, for one, became a TV News Anchor, while Oliver Queen picked up his (in)famous rough-edged personality and left-wing ideals (as well as his fabulous goatee).

For me, though, the clearest line in the sand - at least where DC's major heroes were concerned - was the one drawn in the Batman books.

Groundbreaking developments and painfully outdated dialogue, all behind the cut! )

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lego_joker

June 2013

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